Follow Me

Close

The United Nations envoy for Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, reporting to the Security Council, urgently stressed the need for a peace agreement to end the conflict in Yemen. He indicated that Houthis refused to even discuss a proposed agreement on the port city of Hodeidah, controlled by the Iranian-backed militia. An agreement would have helped in preventing a further deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Hodeidah

He said that his proposal — covering security, economic and humanitarian elements — would allow commercial and humanitarian supplies into Al Hodeidah while halting the diversion of customs revenues and taxes that could be spent on salaries and services.

Regrettably, he said, the delegation of the Houthis and the General People’s Congress (Former President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s party) —in Sana’a, had refused to discuss such an agreement.

 

The Coalition Supporting Legitimacy in Yemen called on the United Nations to ensure the free flow of humanitarian shipments through the Port of Hodeidah. Badly needed food and medical supplies are not reaching people who need them, which is exacerbating the humanitarian crisis in Yemen.  The coalition also asserted that Houthi rebels are seizing and selling humanitarian supplies that pass through the port.

The following is the full statement:

“The Coalition is deeply concerned about the humanitarian situation in Yemen. We are doing everything in our power to ensure that the Yemeni population receives the food and medicines it needs.

“Hodeidah port is an important entry point for humanitarian supplies. But it is currently in the hands of the Houthi rebels, who use it to smuggle arms and people. Houthi rebels also finance their ongoing violent campaign to overthrow the legitimate government by seizing humanitarian supplies and selling them for exorbitant sums.

“We have called on the United Nations to exercise oversight of Hodeidah port to ensure the free flow of humanitarian shipments. Other ports including Aden, Mukalla and other airports are open as routes for humanitarian supplies.”