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March KSA In Focus

KSA Mission Newsletter March 2017

The month’s issue provides an update on Saudi’s contribution to a new fund to protect cultural heritage from destruction by extremist groups, the situation in Yemen and Saudi Arabia’s appeal for peace in the country, the potential for greater cooperation between the EU and the Kingdom on counter-terrorism and HRH Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman’s promising visit to President Donald Trump in Washington.

La newsletter est également disponible en français: Focus Arabie Saoudite Mars 2017

Salam

Salam (meaning peace in Arabic) is a new Saudi initiative that aims to promote mutual understanding between Saudi people and the rest of the world by opening communication channels on all aspects of cultural life.

The Salam Project is an attempt to face the many issues that have stopped the flow of communication and understanding between Saudi Arabia and the world beyond. It is an honest and safe forum for open discussion and positive exchange both for Saudis and non-Saudis alike. Salam aims to help us appreciate what we have in common and talk about some of those more awkward issues that have been ignored or avoided due to a lack of understanding and a reluctance to communicate. This in turn has tended to created unnecessary barriers between both sides. By opening these communication channels and fostering exchange and understanding, Salam hopes to turn such negatives into something positive.

Although still in its early stages, the project has tackled subjects ranging from Saudi history, cuisine, art and festivals such as Al Janadriyah, to education, countering extremism, women in society and human rights law.

You can learn more about the Salam project in the video below or visit www.salam4cc.com. You can even follow the project on its social media channels on Twitter and Facebook.

Under the National Transformation Plan unveiled by the Saudi Arabia this month, the Kingdom has allocated nearly $1 billion (€0.9 billion) to preserve its cultural heritage. In an ambitious bid to end reliance on oil, the Kingdom is investing in tourism, aiming to increase spending by Saudis at home instead of on holidays abroad. Encouraging visits to local places of beauty or interest is a key Vision 2030 goal. The Kingdom has several world-class sites, some in remote areas, which are all but unknown outside of the Kingdom. For instance, Watan Emosudah, with its low-covered alleyways thick with debris and highly grown thistles, is one of around 4,000 old villages in Asir, where measures will be taken to save agricultural tradition and boost the tourism sector in Saudi Arabia.

 

Saudi Vision 2030: Taking Pride In Our Cultural Heritage

 

The Kingdom takes immense pride in the historical and cultural legacy of its Saudi, Arab and Islamic heritage. Saudi Arabian land was, and continues to be, known for its ancient civilizations and trade routes at the crossroads of global trade. This cultural heritage has given Saudi society the richness and diversity it is known for today.

 

The Kingdom recognizes the importance of preserving this sophisticated heritage in order to promote national unity and consolidate true Islamic and Arab values. Saudi Arabia will endeavour to strengthen, preserve and highlight its national identity so that it can guide the lives of future generations. It will continue to work on the restoration of national, Arab, Islamic and ancient cultural sites and strive to have them registered internationally to make them accessible to everyone and, in the process, create cultural events and build world-class museums which will attract visitors from near and far.